Motor Trend

Every season has a defining fashion item or two, for fall 2013,  it’s the moto jacket. Moto is slang for the omnipresent motorcycle influenced jackets, taking to the streets on every level of the contemporary market. Be it buttery or faux leather or some sort of coated twill, they are cleanly urbane or encrusted with industrial zippers and studs. There are biker, bomber, baseball, denim, quilted and draped jacket styles.

Leather and leather-looks have been gaining speed since last year, for women and men. Items include jackets, vests, jeans, dresses, tops, skirts and leggings. Leather details, trim, fronts or sleeves are found on sweaters, tee shirts, jackets, jeans and leggings. A touch of leather adds bad-ass sass. The moto-jacket is the must-have piece!

Get your moto on with fall 2013's must-have leather jackets!

Get your moto on with fall 2013’s must-have leather jackets!

These easy riders are found in almost every fashion collection including Burberry, Vince, Theory, Helmut Lang, Elie Tahari and most other contemporary and designer lines. They also are also found at democratic prices in places like Forever 21 and Zara.

Leather up and take control, these power pieces have a way of taking the air out of the room. Moto jackets are worth the investment as they have classic attitude and the life span of a denim jacket. Pair with jeans for play or cashmere for the boardroom. Show who’s boss at work or throw over a sequin dress to edge up the night. They rock with camo jeans for tough-as-nails chic or soften the blow, by pairing with a feminine pastel skirt or top. Get your moto on and hit the road!

Dix&Pond is the blog of Dix & Pond Consulting Creative and strategic consulting for retail, wholesale apparel,  footwear, consumer products and branding agencies. Follow me to get the latest posts


Fashion Faux Pas-Stereotyping Older Consumers

For decades fashion retailers rode the Baby Boomer purchasing wave as they started, advanced and continue their careers. They were the first generation of educated women who fully intended to join the professional ranks, often putting off child-rearing to later in life or never at all. Consequently, they are the most-travelled, wealthiest and most independent women ever in the westernized world.  Retailers are always looking for unmet consumer demand and opportunities.  This large demographic still offers opportunity for companies that don’t fall in the trap of underestimating her, by addressing her with one broad brush.

There is unmet demand for age-appropriate, forward fashion for a 45+ contemporary customer.

There is unmet demand for age-appropriate, forward fashion for a 45+ contemporary customer.

This is the misconception. As all women age, they no longer want to show their figure and take fashion risks. They want cheaper quality and want to disappear into a decorative tunic. I won’t name names, but you all know the colorful, “soft” retailers that subscribe to a stereotypical formula and have hit a ceiling in an aging market. The customer for this type of merchandise is already well-served.

How could brands that target an older customer fail with a burgeoning aging female population? There are many lifestyle and niche markets in men and women of all ages from extremely conservative to fashion-obsessives. It is critical to understand the lifestyle and persona of the target audience and have realistic expectations of the demand.

Many 45+women still have great bodies, a sophisticated fashion sense and plenty of disposable income. They care about their appearance. Many customers don’t want to identify as old and reject the brands that imply it. The designers and retailers who subscribe to a one-size fits all image of this age group are having their matronly hat handed to them.

I know many stylish women in their 40-80’s, that won’t set foot in the well-known specialty stores and sites that target a “so-called” aging consumer with their floaty tops and frumpy pants. In fact, the softer the body, the more flattering structure becomes in a garment. Companies need to consider their specific target woman, values, taste, income and needs.

Of course, people’s bodies change as they age. All apparel companies in any category, have to target an age/body type for their consumer. They have to develop a standard fit, but not necessarily safe product to go with it. In some sense, the notion of a larger fit only for an aging population is becoming debatable, because of rising obesity rates in younger people raised on whipped caramel lattes.

There are fashion-forward contemporary brands such as Theory, Vince, Lululemon, Diane Von Furstenburg, AG, Joie to name a few, who are enjoying great success because they work for a wide range of body types that relate to their brand. Unfortunately the list is short. There is also a male boomer who wants stylish age appropriate contemporary merchandise. Brands like Hugo Boss, Theory, John Varvatos, Robert Graham, AG and Michael Kors are appealing to this ageless male contemporary customer. I believe the men’s business is experiencing robust sales because young men are adopting more dressed up looks for an edge in the job market, the major trend toward slimmer silhouettes and the 45+ customer who is fit, has money and doesn’t want to look old.

Fashion foward shoes & bags have been stand out sellers for all ages. (Valentino Rockstud Ballet Flat)

Fashion foward shoes & bags have been stand out sellers for all ages. (Valentino Rockstud Ballet Flat)

Why have shoes, bags, accessory and beauty products been the standouts categories for years? Partly because these are the democratic categories, in which all women can participate. There is a redundant oversupply of apparel in the market. Opportunity lies in forward, casual, flattering merchandise that accommodates an aging body. It may be a tad longer, less clingy and revealing, but maintain a serious sense of style, quality and sophistication. Simplicity is always in good taste. What is age-appropriate? Appropriateness, more than anything, is a flattering fit.

Some other posts you might enjoy:

Tough Retail: 7 Ways to Grow Your Consumer Brand

Why Fashion Brands Fail to Thrive


The Dix & Pond Blog, by Stephanie Bernier is the blog of  Dix & Pond Consulting, a Boston-based, company that consults on business strategy, trends, creative direction, brand experience, product development and merchandising. Clients include retailers, apparel, footwear & consumer companies.  CONTACT US TODAY! 

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