Under Armour Looks for Growth in Athletic-Inspired Sportswear Trend

Under Armour Announces New UAS Line

Under Armour launches their newest initiative, UAS or Under Armour Sportswear September 15, at New York Fashion Week for immediate sale at Barney’s, Mr. Porter, their own brick and mortar stores and a dedicated UAS website. This upscale, fashion sportswear product is anything, but performance athletic apparel. The athletic-inspired clothing is targeting “ambitious Millennials” with “modern American sportswear, at home in a professional work place and not on the field.

UAS Under Armour Sportswear

Photo credit Under Armour

Why UAS Makes Sense for Under Armour

Some people may be scratching their heads over this move into sportswear, but it makes perfect sense for a several reasons.

In 1997, Under Armour was a pioneer that introduced expensive, fashion performance apparel to a market used to activewear as thoughtless, cheap basics from footwear companies. They were the first major aspirational athletic brand for men, as Lululemon was for women.

Under Armour created an athletic brand that sold strength, prowess and status in the mind of the wearer and by the way, sold comfortable, performance apparel. Fashion branding is about stirring emotion and they have been squarely in the fashion business, since the beginning. They upped the ante on the whole men’s athletic market.

Under Armour is an epic brand, at a time when it is getting harder to achieve mega-status in a niche-driven, individualist market. The appeal of their brand gives them license to branch out into other categories and price points, upscale, technically-inspired sportswear being one.

Consumers started wearing the higher quality, more stylish and comfortable clothing out of the gym. The use of performance fabrics and athletic details in everyday sportswear has been gaining steam for a while, as a natural extension of this trend.

The market is overflowing with spandex blended fabrics, polyester is no longer considered “low-rent”, performance properties abound and even merino wool has been “recast” as a technical fabric. Apparel startups Kit and Ace (former Lululemon founders) and Ministry (former MIT students) are two examples of this major trend. The new Van Heusen Flex Collection is selling comfort and technical properties to the men’s moderate wear-to-work market.

Sportswear is being inspired by athletic apparel and is experiencing a huge disruptive change to the look, feel and function of these categories.

UAS Under Armour Sportswear for men and women

Photo credit Under Armour

The Athletic Apparel Market Is Extremely Competitive

For more than a decade now athletic apparel has been the big growth story in a lack-luster apparel industry. Athletic startups and existing brand extensions have exploded. There is much less breathing room in the active market right now. Either you innovate, take risks, extend your brand in new categories or stagnate, shrink or die. Puma, Adidas and Nike are all responding to this market shift with collaborations and extensions.

This market explosion has blurred the lines of distribution away from sporting goods to all retail channels, not good news for apparel-dominated sporting goods stores.

Under Armour was born from apparel lineage, so it is an easier transition for them. Many strong athletic footwear or sporting goods brands have yet to even capitalize on the seismic shift that happened in active lifestyle apparel. They are missing a great opportunity and do this at their peril. UAS has now gone beyond athleisure to sportswear.

UAS won’t be Under Armour’s biggest initiative simply because of price points, certainly not the huge opportunity of their new moderate distribution to stores like Kohl’s; but it will allow them to capture the imaginations and wallets of new customers.

 

Some other posts you might enjoy:

Decoding Millennial Shopping Traits & Habits

Are Sporting Goods & Outdoor in a Death Spiral?

7 Common Fashion Brand Management Mistakes

The Dix & Pond Blog, by Stephanie Bernier is the blog of  Dix & Pond Consulting, a Boston-based, company that consults on business strategy, creative direction, brand experience, trends, product development and merchandising. Clients include retailers, apparel, footwear & consumer companies.  CONTACT US TODAY! 

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Tough Retail: 7 Ways to Grow Your Consumer Brand

Seismic Changes Are Happening to Retail

Under-employment, stagnant wages, historically high school debt, credit card debt, large healthcare deductibles, staggering urban rent, first homes, weddings and new babies, is there any wonder why Millennials seek value in their discretionary purchases like apparel, accessories, footwear and home?

This is the overhang from a deep recession, the Affordable Care Act and lackluster recovery. It has given rise to the Amazon-effect, outlets, successful discounters like TJX, fast-fashion, rental, consignment and intense comparison shopping. Who can afford to pay full-price?

Practically every retailer and brand is chasing the most cash-strapped generation in decades, because the Millennial generation, ages 15-33 is now the largest population in the US, finally surpassing the much wealthier Baby Boomers and Generation X.

A quote in the Wall Street Journal on May 12, really caught my attention. “Non-discretionary spending on health, insurance, education, and housing has taken an extra 4% out of personal consumption expenditures in 2015 compared with 2000, according to Craig Johnson, president of consulting firm Customer Growth Partners. That has reduced the discretionary spending available for traditional retailers by $500 billon, more than the combined annual sales of Walmart Stores and Costco Wholesale combined.” No wonder  we are seriously over-stored.

Traffic is down at brick and mortar retailers, everyone is trying to explain it, but the reasons are actually quite obvious. There are huge headwinds on spending, so consumers are chasing good deals or staying home.

Online retail, even though it represents less than 10% of all purchases is the fastest growing retail channel. This reflects the ease of comparison shopping, selection and simplicity for insanely time-strapped consumers. It isn’t the best way to browse or make impulse purchases. Who goes on Amazon, just to see what’s new?

Survival Strategies in Tough Times for Consumer Brands

What should apparel, footwear, home and consumer discretionary companies do to combat intense spending headwinds? Here are seven ways to grow in tough times:

Offer brand value. Brands with a consistent, clear identity and experience will rise above the clutter and command higher prices than weak concepts and me-too products. Think Apple, Nike, Under Armour, Kate Spade, Madewell and West Elm.

Be strategically focused on core strengths. It’s necessary to test new things, but focus on your sweet spots, invest in your strengths and best brands. Don’t get romanced with low-value, expensive projects and extensions.

Value great design. Creativity and innovation create demand and pricing power. Big marketing efforts without great products to back them up, won’t fool consumers, who value authenticity.

Look for untapped markets or niche opportunities. For instance, the  underserved plus-size markets for women and men, trending activities, hot fitness trends, growing sports, hobbies, etc..

Increase DTC efforts. Many stores will close, decreasing available doors for your apparel, footwear and consumer products. Your direct to consumer efforts online, with company-owned stores, pop-up stores, partnerships, direct mail etc., will help you control your brand message and destiny.

Think beyond Millennials. Brands with cross-generational “lifestyle” appeal will weather the competitive storm better than discretionary fashion brands just targeting Millennials. Baby Boomers have the greatest wealth in the history of the US and are due to inherit even more, even though they also took a hit during the Recession.

Take risks. This is counterintuitive in bad times. Hire experienced and visionary people who can execute a well-balanced strategy of taking creative risks while covering established business.

 

Some other posts you might enjoy:

7 Common Fashion Brand Management Mistakes

The New Definition of Athletic Apparel

Decoding Millennial Shopping Traits & Habits

 

The Dix & Pond Blog, by Stephanie Bernier is the blog of  Dix & Pond Consulting, a Boston-based, company that consults on business strategy, creative direction, brand experience, trends, product development and merchandising. Clients include retailers, apparel, footwear & consumer companies.  CONTACT US TODAY! 

Thank you for sharing with a friend, if you enjoyed the post! 

 

 

The New Definition of Athletic Apparel

Athletic Apparel Has Been Permanently Disrupted

Remember when athletic apparel was mostly made by footwear and sports equipment companies? It was budget-priced, logo-driven basic tees, sweats and shorts, sold primarily in sporting goods stores, for working out and active sports. It was the ugly step child to the primary businesses.

Market disruption started about 10 years ago when higher-value athletic apparel started to hit the market by fashion and price pioneers, Under Armour and Lululemon. They were innovators with more costly, functional fabrics, fashion-driven styling and unique branding; think of Under Armour’s powerful mannequins and Lululemon’s yoga cult brand experience.

Their flattering and comfortable styles, outperformed and outlasted their cheaper competitors. Customers found emotional value paying for creative, sexy and fashionable looks at a higher price and started wearing them in and out of the gym. They created “aspirational status” athletic brands.

The athleisure trend took off and has been the biggest trend in apparel for more than 5 years. Active and casual apparel blurred into a new category. The genie is out of the bottle and it is never going back.

Athleta pushes urban lifestyle products.
Athleta pushes urban lifestyle products.

Competition in Athletic Apparel Has Gotten Fierce

As athleisure has grown, the competition for market share has gotten fierce. Many non-athletic brands including Tory Burch (Torysport) and Free People (FP Movement) now offer their own active apparel. Footwear companies like Nike really upped their fashion game and companies are doing designer collaborations like Stella McCartney and Kayne West’s Yeezy for Adidas.

High-end, ecommerce specialists like Carbon 38, and Bandier (online and opening stores), have sprouted up, carrying ediger brands, like Michi and Heroine Sport. Designer ecommerce company Net-A-Porter started Net-A-Sporter.

Lululemon is seriously challenged lately by Gap’s Athleta. Athleta fully understands the blurring of the category with their combination of performance and sophisticated street wear looks (they used to only carry bright colors and the cliché “zen-like” NorCal prints). Lululemon has recently vowed to double-down on market-leading innovation and put a greater focus on performance athletes, in a recent article with Bloomberg.

Lululemon is pushing market-leading innovation.

Lululemon is pushing market-leading innovation.

Retailers like Target, Kohl’s and JC Penney greatly improved their active offerings. Macy’s, late to the athleisure party, now has a big selection in 700+ stores and online. Victoria’s Secret has an growing sports bra and athletic business. In fact, the sport bra  business has seriously dented fashion bras. Fast-fashion stores like Primark, have large active assortments at rock bottom prices.

Primark has rock-bottom prices, like $10 pants.

Primark has rock-bottom prices, like $10 pants.

Active Apparel Distribution Has Been Diluted

Distribution has been widely diluted across all retail channels. Sporting goods stores are no longer where most women buy their athletic apparel. Footwear and sports equipment companies have to sell direct to consumer and forge forward-thinking relationships beyond the sporting goods channel to regain market share.

It’s no wonder retailers like Sports Authority and defunct City Sports didn’t capitalize on this mega-trend. Sporting goods stores have to do more than display apparel in cavernous spaces and start competing head-on with real apparel merchants. They must be discerning, take brand risks and edit out the so-so.

Adidas at Urban Outfitters.

Adidas at Urban Outfitters.

2016’s Definition of Active Apparel

Athletic apparel is two-pronged. A smaller percentage is worn for true performance sports, but the lions’ share is used as casual, lifestyle clothing. Shorts designed for running, are a teenager’s summer staple. Sports bras are worn all day. Leggings and sweats are paired with Uggs for school. Hoodies are everywhere.

Design teams must understand the bulk of their products will never be worn for active sports. Personally, I own at least a dozen Lululemon tops and have never even tried yoga. Active designers simply can’t assign cursory importance to the “lifestyle” part of their business.

The definition of athletic apparel in 2016 is predominantly knit-driven, fitness inspired, comfortable casual apparel that is made of functional and innovative fabrics that can be worn for range of casual uses, including sports activities.

Fierce competition in the women’s and men’s apparel and accessories markets requires real innovation in styling and function. I’m not just talking “anti-stink” here, but unique and compelling designs as trend relevant as the underlying brand. The emotional connection to an active lifestyle is more important than the intended use of the clothes.

The world doesn’t need another ordinary half-zip. If the label was removed would anyone recognize your brand? What’s compelling about your products? The innovative brands will have pricing power, the copy-cats will experience significant mark downs and price deflation.

 

The Dix & Pond Blog is the blog of  Dix & Pond Consulting,  a Boston-based, company that consults on trend and creative direction, brand experience and business strategy, product development, merchandising and provides executive coaching for retail, apparel, footwear & consumer products companies.  CONTACT US TODAY!  or call 617.733.7411

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Caged Animals – Gladiator Shoes

Act out your best warrior, bondage, bohemian and dominatrix fantasies. Take a walk on the wild side. Very few shoes have the power to transform the wearer and “blow-the-mind” of the observer to the extent, of the the “Caged Animal” gladiators for 2015. This badass shoe trend proves it’s good to be bad!

Gladiator sandals are white-hot for 2015.

Gladiator sandals are white-hot for 2015.

Sexy caged sandals, pumps and wedges come in a variety of leathers, suedes and metallics. Look for powerful details like studding, zippers, tassels, ties and athletic bottoms. Radical fashion trends like knee-high gladiators, are burning white-hot and will give birth to tamer versions for the masses in 2016. Wear them with shorts, skirts and culottes.

These shoes are scene stealers. Keep everything else minimal for maximum impact.

Some of the best are from Chanel, Ancient Greek Sandals, Stuart Weitzman, Valentino, Christian Louboutin, Sam Edelman, Free People, Michael Kors, BCBG, Joie, many others including the athle-chic, innovative Lunarsandiator Sky Hi from Nike!

Dix&Pond is the blog of Dix & Pond Consulting Creative and strategic consulting for retail, wholesale apparel, footwear, consumer products and branding agencies. Follow me to get the latest posts

Fashion Activewear Wins the Gold

Let’s face it, there is too much apparel offered for the North American market to absorb. Strong evidence is that most price points of casual apparel, haven’t risen in decades. Part of the deflation was the elimination of quotas. The main reason is when there is an over-supply of something, it loses pricing power.  40-60% off anyone?Fashion Activewear

Another factor is a lack of excitement in casual fashion. Year after year, we see endless commodity tees, jeans and shorts,  Big yawn.

There is a bright spot. Athletic wear, active wear, performance apparel, whatever you call it, is dominating casual fashion. These industry terms are nothing more than comfortable casual clothes, in unique fabrics that flatter the body, while taking a beating. Appearing active provides an “in” to the hip club of people who care about their bodies and wellness; even if most people will never do yoga or run a marathon.There has been fashion “risk taking” in silhouettes and fabrics in the active category. Lululemon even with their recent pant and PR foibles has dominated by offering compelling fashion in a range of technical fabrics.  They broke all the dreary rules of developing safe, cheap active apparel. Dense and constructed fabrics smooth flaws and support the body.  High prices are part of the status appeal. The offer continuous newness. Rule breakers often find opportunity in the road-less-traveled.

Who cares if clothes are anti-stink, moisture wicking or breathable, if you aren’t wearing them to exercise? They have supernatural powers to make the wearer feel sexier, current and part of the aspirational “it” club. Fashion is about emotion after all. Under Armour, the other dominant brand, born from apparel roots, understands they are selling “power” not poly. (Under Armour’s 2013’s revenue grew 27.1%) Companies with a strong “brand promise” have pricing power.

Smartly, Nike understands the trend and stepped up their apparel game compared to most footwear companies. Nike announced that its branded apparel has grown by 40% in the last 3 years!  This isn’t true for most footwear brands, creating humdrum clothing, as an afterthought. There is a mushrooming market for fashion-driven active brands like Michi, Prism Sport, Koral and Stella MCartney for Adidas. You can see others on the newly launched, active fashion ecommerce site, Carbon 38.  

Dix&Pond is the blog of Dix & Pond Consulting Creative and strategic consulting for retail, wholesale apparel,  footwear, consumer products and branding agencies. Follow me to get the latest posts

Will Fashion Still Drive Sports Apparel?

Active apparel has experienced significant growth over the past five years. According to Forbes magazine estimates, the global sports apparel market was worth $135 billion in 2012. It is no secret that Lululemon and Under Armour became the defacto leaders of the sports apparel industry in terms of fashion and overall growth rates. Nike, the largest player in sports apparel, upped their game significantly and their share of the overall activewear market increased from 3.9% in 2007 to 4.9% in 2012, according to Forbes.

Men's is a huge opportunity for Lululemon.

Men’s is a huge opportunity for Lululemon.

The sports apparel market was once controlled by male-dominated footwear companies that dished out low quality, masculine basics emblazoned with their logos. Apparel was a “foot note” in their bureaucratic shoe cultures, driven by industrial designers, on a rigid shoe production schedule with little understanding of fashion. This has been true of other shoe companies that extend into apparel as well. Apparel companies operate and think in a very different way. They tend to be more agile, trend driven, work closer to need and repeat very little season to season.

Under Armour was born from an apparel mentality. With its higher prices and slick styling, they quickly became the company to beat in men’s sports apparel. They added sex appeal and attainable luxury in a sea of dumpy poly/cotton logo tees. Lululemon came along and blew away every preconceived notion about the category. They proved consumers are willing to pay a premium for innovative feminine styling, flattering fits and exciting fashion color. They almost never discount and have trained their customers to buy now, with a  limited inventory on new styles. I see a huge future for this company. Women are introducing Lulu to their men and are a fixture in the dressing area with their female counterparts. They are currently constrained by their store count. I could see men’s growing significantly and a huge opportunity, if they did Lulu kids. Companies like Athleta and Title Nine aren’t real competition for Lululemon. They are riding the sports apparel wave, but their basic styling and “Zen-like” prints are more masculine, formulaic and old-school.

Lululemon and Under Armour brought fashion to a dead zone. The genie is out of the bottle and it is never going back. These companies offer “aspirational luxury” and consumers love wearing these comfy duds on the street, whether they participate in sports or not. Nike was smart to apply the same winning principles to their apparel without knocking off them off. These leaders are in constant forward motion. The future isn’t about commodity black yoga pants.

Flattering and feminine styles drive sales at Lululemon.

Flattering and feminine styles drive sales at Lululemon.

Brands create value with a unique vision that is consistent across their product lines and find the audience to whom it resonates. The challenge for footwear companies in apparel is their industrial design driven culture. Most athletic footwear companies apparel offerings aren’t consistent with their shoe brands. They tend to be less hip and very sports marketing driven. Women don’t care about athlete endorsements and they buy a lot more clothes than men. The market is wide open for another sports apparel brand with original ideas to grab market share.

Dix&Pond is the blog of Dix & Pond Consulting Creative and strategic consulting for retail, wholesale apparel,  footwear, consumer products and branding agencies. Follow me to get the latest posts

Feeding Frenzy – Lululemon

I admit it, I’m a dyed-in-the-Lycra, full-blown fan of Lululemon Athletica. I was one of the sharks in the holiday feeding frenzy for all things Lulu. On a visit last week after Christmas, I could hardly move around the 60 or so people I counted in the little store lusting after Lulu. They were spending gift cards, making exchanges and if they expected markdowns, they were sorely disappointed. This fashionable Canadian purveyor of athletic clothing has risen to cult status at full-price. This is a true fairy-tale ending to a lackluster holiday season for most retailers.

There are always sexy and functional sports bras and tops.

There are always sexy and functional sports bras and tops.

In a highly competitive apparel market Lululemon has proven that there is always still room for fresh design and a compelling brand experience. (I think the stores are bit dark, though). They churn out unique and creative silhouettes that flatter the athletic and not-so-athletic bodies of their adoring masses. They create demand for their feminine and tastefully sexy styles. They tout performance fabrications for real yoga and running aficionados, but the rest of us just love the great quality and are willing to pay for it. They have broken every rule of the old footwear apparel players. They make expensive, feminine, comfortable, durable and sometimes radical styles for women and men. They almost singlehandedly started the trend for yoga wear as everyday wear in and out of the gym.

Certainly upper management from the major athletic companies are sending spy drones in the stores to figure out their secret sauce. They are buying and dissecting garments and creating their own vanilla versions. This is a recipe without all the ingredients. They are missing the point; it is Lululemon’s originality that makes it special. It is getting to the finish line first. Who cares about second place?

The opportunity for growth for Lululemon is still very great, as they are still far from a household name. They could benefit from larger stores and certainly more men’s product. Girls would be a smash hit, too. If I was a Nordstrom or Bloomingdales’s buyer, I would be begging for a wholesale line.

December Lululemon deliveries included signature pink and black jackets and a unique lace print used on tops and bottoms.

December Lululemon deliveries included signature pink and black jackets and a unique lace print used on tops and bottoms.

Dix&Pond is the blog of www.dixandpond.com Creative and strategic consulting for retail and wholesale apparel, shoe and consumer product companies. Follow me to get the latest posts

Well Shod- Fall 2012 Shoe Trends

Shoes and bags have been on a retail tear lately. The excitement in footwear and handbag design is palpable. As designers have taken style risks in colors, shapes and materials, consumers have rewarded them with ever-increasing sales. The Saks 5th Avenue flagship which has one of the most extensive and exciting designer shoe floors on the planet is expanding once again. Macy’s Herald Square is creating the largest shoe floor in the world at 39,000 square feet. There is a highly innovative period happening in athletic, casual, dress shoes and boots. In the shoe biz, the ante is up and it’s no time to bluff.

Fall 2012 Shoe Trends

Fall 2012 Shoe Trends

Shoes and handbags like the beauty area, are inclusionary of all sizes and ages, so all customers can play in the game. Plus-sized customers have under-sized apparel options so they turn to the democratic shoe floor for a fashion update. With shoes (with a few extreme exceptions), the forgotten male or female boomer can send a major fashion smoke signal, without looking like a desperate fool.

Women covet shoes and will reach beyond their means for status brands like Prada, Miu Miu, Valentino, Tory Burch, Brian Atwood and Christian Louboutin. They are also stuffing their closets with Uggs, Sperry, Kate Spade, Coach, Michael Kors, Nike, Converse, Hunter, BCBG, Stuart Weitzman, Cole Haan, Ivanka Trump, Tom’s and Isaac Mizrahi to name a few.

Here’s a run down on the best Fall 2012 trends:

Color and Patterns – Colors and patterns such as animal prints, are major drivers of newness in all categories of shoes

Lighter Than Air – Ultralight and colorful running and athletic shoes from Nike, Asics, New Balance Minimus, etc.

Retro Vulcanized – Retro sneakers are hot in new materials and colors from Superga, Uggs, Converse and other designers.

Glam Casuals – Casual has gone glamorous in boat shoes, slippers, boots, loafers and sneakers with glam styling such as metallic, sequins and glitter

Tough Love – Biker details such as buckles, straps and multi-studs on boots, sandals and smoking slippers

Oxford Grad – Classic and inventive oxfords continue in contrast colors and materials (Valentino even has lace tipped patent leather oxfords!)

Tipping Point – Ultra high ice pick heels and pointy toed pumps

Feminine Flats – The world is flat.. especially hot are smoking slippers in a wide variety of materials

Dix&Pond is the blog of Dix&Pond…creative and strategic consulting for retail and wholesale apparel, shoe and consumer products.

In Step – Colorful Shoes

For several years, shoe and handbag sales have been far more robust than women’s apparel. In an economic downturn, women turn to accessories for a wardrobe update. A strong new silhouette, pattern, status brand or colorful accessory can refresh existing apparel basics. It is not surprising that women have also turned to exciting and unusual colors and finishes in nail polish recently. Nail color is one of the fastest growing areas in beauty, as it gives a woman an inexpensive way to make a daring fashion statement. Beauty companies like the shoe and accessory manufacturers have continued to “up-the-ante” and offer color where no woman (or many manufacturers) dared to go in the past. They have created some of the most showstopping footwear lately and are getting paid for their risk taking. I expect this emotionally driven shoe trend to continue in seasons to come.

Colorful shoes are a huge footwear trend for 2012.

Shoes and bags have taken center stage over apparel sales in the past few years. Very colorful statement shoes and bags are a dominant accessory trend for 2012.

Who needs another basic black pant; but who can resist a pair of hot pink “life changing” sandals?

The hottest trend in shoes (and handbags) this year is strong, unabashed color and pattern. Bright, neon, pastel colors and prints are on sandals, wedges, espadrilles, pumps, platforms, two-tone oxfords, flats and athletic shoes. Personally, I couldn’t pass up orange patent wedges from J. Crew and was mesmerized by a yellow patent Ted Baker bag. Banana yellow? I have never owned a yellow accessory in my life.

Some of the best colorful shoes this season are from unexpected sources…Stuart Weitzman, Cole Haan and Nike. Great color and patterns can be found from J Crew, Tom’s, Sperry Topsider, Kate Spade, Fendi, Giuseppe Zanotti, Brian Atwood, Prada and many more.

Did you buy a colorful shoe this season?

Dix&pond is the blog of Dix& Pond Consulting.

Cardiac Arrest – Cole Haan’s Spring Oxfords

These scene-stealing Cole Haan Oxfords left me gasping for Nike air!

 I was left gasping for Nike air when I got a gander at Cole Haan’s new collection of wing-tipped, spectator oxfords for spring 2012. My heart skipped a beat when I saw their 3.5″ high heeled Lucinda Air Oxford pump in various fashion combinations of brown and hot pink (they have more compelling names like Beet/Sequoia), Black/White Pine and Sequoia/Cockle. These shoes will turn a mere mortal into a power broker in the click of a well-shod heel.

They also have a flat wingtip oxford called the Skylar…it also comes in a swanky white gold metallic combination.

The shoes have me craving a pair of well-cut menswear trousers to show off my best “manners”. 

This fashion tour-de-force is a big step in the risk taking direction for Cole Haan. They are sure to create a stampede from the fashion crowd. My husband has fallen for their killer Air Colton and Air Franklin’s, for men, too. Who would have imagined?

By the way they even have their Nike Air technology for added comfort. File this in the category of glam slam!

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