The New Definition of Athletic Apparel

Athletic Apparel Has Been Permanently Disrupted

Remember when athletic apparel was mostly made by footwear and sports equipment companies? It was budget-priced, logo-driven basic tees, sweats and shorts, sold primarily in sporting goods stores, for working out and active sports. It was the ugly step child to the primary businesses.

Market disruption started about 10 years ago when higher-value athletic apparel started to hit the market by fashion and price pioneers, Under Armour and Lululemon. They were innovators with more costly, functional fabrics, fashion-driven styling and unique branding; think of Under Armour’s powerful mannequins and Lululemon’s yoga cult brand experience.

Their flattering and comfortable styles, outperformed and outlasted their cheaper competitors. Customers found emotional value paying for creative, sexy and fashionable looks at a higher price and started wearing them in and out of the gym. They created “aspirational status” athletic brands.

The athleisure trend took off and has been the biggest trend in apparel for more than 5 years. Active and casual apparel blurred into a new category. The genie is out of the bottle and it is never going back.

Athleta pushes urban lifestyle products.
Athleta pushes urban lifestyle products.

Competition in Athletic Apparel Has Gotten Fierce

As athleisure has grown, the competition for market share has gotten fierce. Many non-athletic brands including Tory Burch (Torysport) and Free People (FP Movement) now offer their own active apparel. Footwear companies like Nike really upped their fashion game and companies are doing designer collaborations like Stella McCartney and Kayne West’s Yeezy for Adidas.

High-end, ecommerce specialists like Carbon 38, and Bandier (online and opening stores), have sprouted up, carrying ediger brands, like Michi and Heroine Sport. Designer ecommerce company Net-A-Porter started Net-A-Sporter.

Lululemon is seriously challenged lately by Gap’s Athleta. Athleta fully understands the blurring of the category with their combination of performance and sophisticated street wear looks (they used to only carry bright colors and the cliché “zen-like” NorCal prints). Lululemon has recently vowed to double-down on market-leading innovation and put a greater focus on performance athletes, in a recent article with Bloomberg.

Lululemon is pushing market-leading innovation.

Lululemon is pushing market-leading innovation.

Retailers like Target, Kohl’s and JC Penney greatly improved their active offerings. Macy’s, late to the athleisure party, now has a big selection in 700+ stores and online. Victoria’s Secret has an growing sports bra and athletic business. In fact, the sport bra  business has seriously dented fashion bras. Fast-fashion stores like Primark, have large active assortments at rock bottom prices.

Primark has rock-bottom prices, like $10 pants.

Primark has rock-bottom prices, like $10 pants.

Active Apparel Distribution Has Been Diluted

Distribution has been widely diluted across all retail channels. Sporting goods stores are no longer where most women buy their athletic apparel. Footwear and sports equipment companies have to sell direct to consumer and forge forward-thinking relationships beyond the sporting goods channel to regain market share.

It’s no wonder retailers like Sports Authority and defunct City Sports didn’t capitalize on this mega-trend. Sporting goods stores have to do more than display apparel in cavernous spaces and start competing head-on with real apparel merchants. They must be discerning, take brand risks and edit out the so-so.

Adidas at Urban Outfitters.

Adidas at Urban Outfitters.

2016’s Definition of Active Apparel

Athletic apparel is two-pronged. A smaller percentage is worn for true performance sports, but the lions’ share is used as casual, lifestyle clothing. Shorts designed for running, are a teenager’s summer staple. Sports bras are worn all day. Leggings and sweats are paired with Uggs for school. Hoodies are everywhere.

Design teams must understand the bulk of their products will never be worn for active sports. Personally, I own at least a dozen Lululemon tops and have never even tried yoga. Active designers simply can’t assign cursory importance to the “lifestyle” part of their business.

The definition of athletic apparel in 2016 is predominantly knit-driven, fitness inspired, comfortable casual apparel that is made of functional and innovative fabrics that can be worn for range of casual uses, including sports activities.

Fierce competition in the women’s and men’s apparel and accessories markets requires real innovation in styling and function. I’m not just talking “anti-stink” here, but unique and compelling designs as trend relevant as the underlying brand. The emotional connection to an active lifestyle is more important than the intended use of the clothes.

The world doesn’t need another ordinary half-zip. If the label was removed would anyone recognize your brand? What’s compelling about your products? The innovative brands will have pricing power, the copy-cats will experience significant mark downs and price deflation.

 

The Dix & Pond Blog is the blog of  Dix & Pond Consulting,  a Boston-based, company that consults on trend and creative direction, brand experience and business strategy, product development, merchandising and provides executive coaching for retail, apparel, footwear & consumer products companies.  CONTACT US TODAY!  or call 617.733.7411

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Twelve Hot Design Trends in Athletic Apparel

If you still think of women’s active apparel as polar fleece and half-zip poly jackets you’re living in a time warp. Fashion athletic apparel has disrupted and blurred casual lifestyle apparel, like Uber has to transportation. We aren’t going back to formulaic tees and jeans any time soon, as the dominant uniform of women’s weekend casual.

This seismic shift started when market disruptor Lululemon questioned the assumptions that women didn’t want fashion and were not willing to pay for style, comfort and quality in athletic apparel. Until then women’s activewear was an identical twin to men’s, in equally dismal fabrics and devoid of fashion. Under Armour began pushing the envelope in men’s at the same time as Lululemon. Both of these innovative brands were born from a fashion point-of-view, not the footwear industry that used to drive the category.

Dix & Pond Athletic Apparel Trends

Athleisure was born. Women have adopted the fashion, quality performance fabrics and comfort to wear in and out of the gym, at the expense of the traditional jeans and tee businesses.

As one of  the few bright spots in women’s apparel, competition is rising dramatically. Everyone is getting into the game. Athleta, Gap’s active division has elevated themselves from dated “new-age” California looks to a more urban vibe with a wide range of lifestyle items. Tory Burch, Kate Spade and many startup brands have entered the game. The competitive stakes are much higher now, and only “brand relevant” innovators will win. If your company is following, not innovating, your going to feel the squeeze.

Here are twelve significant trends in women’s athletic apparel design. Did your company see them coming?

Sheer madness. Sheer insets and translucent fabrics add cool functionality and peek-a-boo sex appeal, to everything from tops, legging to outerwear.

Under & over. Highly-evolved sports bras are a key classification to be worn layered and alone. Matching “no-show” undies from leaders such as Lululemon, Under Armour, Moving Comfort and others complete the look.

Self reflection. Playful and highly creative, reflective detailing adds function and fun-factor, to all categories of running apparel.

Printed matters. Hip, urban, abstract and geometric prints are driving legging, capris and short sales. Spiritual, “zen-like” yoga wear prints are now soooo 2010.

Back story. Naughty or nice? Back interest…cut outs, layering, lingerie detailing, halters and criss-cross backs, have been heating up top sales.

Booty call. Design and functional back details and shorts are the ultimate “booty call” and driving bottom sales.

Town down. Regular and micro down filled outerwear vests, parkas, anoraks and baseball jackets are ubiquitous and go uptown in styling. Try this, count how many Barbour, Canada Goose and Moncler jackets you see in 30 minutes on an East Coast city street on a December day.

Dress up. One piece ease and comfort, knit dresses are layered over gym clothes, swimwear or worn alone. This hot category is the ultimate multi-tasker from gym to street.

Metro techno. Unique knit and woven technical fabrics with performance properties such as SPF 50, wicking, anti-stink, water resistance, etc. are used in fashion forward, modern styling. Outerwear is a stand-out category, in new fabrications.

Short & sweet. Short-shorts, boy shorts, gym and bikes shorts layered and worn solo are driving sweet sales.

Walk the talk. Graphic typography plays to the mega-trend for self-expression and individualism. Edgy, motivational and descriptive words, quotes and sayings are on tees, tops, jackets and bottoms.

Tony trousers. The market has gone way beyond yoga pants and leggings to drawstring gym pants, knit jeans and “city pants” in comfortable and durable functional knits and techno wovens.

How did your company do?

Dix&Pond is the blog of Dix & Pond Consulting, Boston-based, product development, creative, branding, business consulting and executive coaching for retail, apparel, footwear & consumer products companies. Follow me to get the latest posts

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Street Smarts – Red Hot Athletic Style

It is survival of the fittest in the urban jungle. Fitness is power. Women are increasingly turning to power workouts such as CrossFit, strength training and boxing. There is also an empowering trend in athletic apparel. It is urban inspired, edgy and sexy. I call it Street Smarts.

The lines are blurred between what was once strictly apparel for the gym and casual sportswear. Men and women are mixing the two in a sporty mélange that goes in and out of the gym. “Athleisure” is the new normal in casual; because it is comfortable, durable and empowering. Lululemon and Under Armour were the birth parents, but now it’s pervasive.

Edgy, urban styling is trending in athletic apparel.

Edgy, urban styling is trending in athletic apparel.

Street Smarts mixes lounging tomboy with hormone-charged bad girl. It is feminine and masculine. Think retro boxing gym.

Body conscious leggings and comfy sweats are the key bottoms. Look for “townie bad boy” outerwear like hoodies and baseball jackets. Important details on tops are radical back interest, sheer and mesh insets. Knit dresses are a key element of Street Smarts worn with leggings. Neoprene, metallics and zipper details add a structured, modern city touch.

Graphics include assertive text and smoky abstract prints. Footwear includes high-top and retro sneakers and combat boots, such as Dr. Marten’s. Backpacks, retro gym bags, baseball caps and headbands complete the look.

The color is grounded by sooty black, heather greys and white, but can be popped with an extroverted color like hot pink or citrine or softened with a pastel like blush or lilac.

Dix&Pond is the blog of Dix & Pond Consulting Creative and strategic consulting for retail, wholesale apparel, footwear, consumer products and branding agencies. Follow me to get the latest posts

Fashion Activewear Wins the Gold

Let’s face it, there is too much apparel offered for the North American market to absorb. Strong evidence is that most price points of casual apparel, haven’t risen in decades. Part of the deflation was the elimination of quotas. The main reason is when there is an over-supply of something, it loses pricing power.  40-60% off anyone?Fashion Activewear

Another factor is a lack of excitement in casual fashion. Year after year, we see endless commodity tees, jeans and shorts,  Big yawn.

There is a bright spot. Athletic wear, active wear, performance apparel, whatever you call it, is dominating casual fashion. These industry terms are nothing more than comfortable casual clothes, in unique fabrics that flatter the body, while taking a beating. Appearing active provides an “in” to the hip club of people who care about their bodies and wellness; even if most people will never do yoga or run a marathon.There has been fashion “risk taking” in silhouettes and fabrics in the active category. Lululemon even with their recent pant and PR foibles has dominated by offering compelling fashion in a range of technical fabrics.  They broke all the dreary rules of developing safe, cheap active apparel. Dense and constructed fabrics smooth flaws and support the body.  High prices are part of the status appeal. The offer continuous newness. Rule breakers often find opportunity in the road-less-traveled.

Who cares if clothes are anti-stink, moisture wicking or breathable, if you aren’t wearing them to exercise? They have supernatural powers to make the wearer feel sexier, current and part of the aspirational “it” club. Fashion is about emotion after all. Under Armour, the other dominant brand, born from apparel roots, understands they are selling “power” not poly. (Under Armour’s 2013’s revenue grew 27.1%) Companies with a strong “brand promise” have pricing power.

Smartly, Nike understands the trend and stepped up their apparel game compared to most footwear companies. Nike announced that its branded apparel has grown by 40% in the last 3 years!  This isn’t true for most footwear brands, creating humdrum clothing, as an afterthought. There is a mushrooming market for fashion-driven active brands like Michi, Prism Sport, Koral and Stella MCartney for Adidas. You can see others on the newly launched, active fashion ecommerce site, Carbon 38.  

Dix&Pond is the blog of Dix & Pond Consulting Creative and strategic consulting for retail, wholesale apparel,  footwear, consumer products and branding agencies. Follow me to get the latest posts

Will Fashion Still Drive Sports Apparel?

Active apparel has experienced significant growth over the past five years. According to Forbes magazine estimates, the global sports apparel market was worth $135 billion in 2012. It is no secret that Lululemon and Under Armour became the defacto leaders of the sports apparel industry in terms of fashion and overall growth rates. Nike, the largest player in sports apparel, upped their game significantly and their share of the overall activewear market increased from 3.9% in 2007 to 4.9% in 2012, according to Forbes.

Men's is a huge opportunity for Lululemon.

Men’s is a huge opportunity for Lululemon.

The sports apparel market was once controlled by male-dominated footwear companies that dished out low quality, masculine basics emblazoned with their logos. Apparel was a “foot note” in their bureaucratic shoe cultures, driven by industrial designers, on a rigid shoe production schedule with little understanding of fashion. This has been true of other shoe companies that extend into apparel as well. Apparel companies operate and think in a very different way. They tend to be more agile, trend driven, work closer to need and repeat very little season to season.

Under Armour was born from an apparel mentality. With its higher prices and slick styling, they quickly became the company to beat in men’s sports apparel. They added sex appeal and attainable luxury in a sea of dumpy poly/cotton logo tees. Lululemon came along and blew away every preconceived notion about the category. They proved consumers are willing to pay a premium for innovative feminine styling, flattering fits and exciting fashion color. They almost never discount and have trained their customers to buy now, with a  limited inventory on new styles. I see a huge future for this company. Women are introducing Lulu to their men and are a fixture in the dressing area with their female counterparts. They are currently constrained by their store count. I could see men’s growing significantly and a huge opportunity, if they did Lulu kids. Companies like Athleta and Title Nine aren’t real competition for Lululemon. They are riding the sports apparel wave, but their basic styling and “Zen-like” prints are more masculine, formulaic and old-school.

Lululemon and Under Armour brought fashion to a dead zone. The genie is out of the bottle and it is never going back. These companies offer “aspirational luxury” and consumers love wearing these comfy duds on the street, whether they participate in sports or not. Nike was smart to apply the same winning principles to their apparel without knocking off them off. These leaders are in constant forward motion. The future isn’t about commodity black yoga pants.

Flattering and feminine styles drive sales at Lululemon.

Flattering and feminine styles drive sales at Lululemon.

Brands create value with a unique vision that is consistent across their product lines and find the audience to whom it resonates. The challenge for footwear companies in apparel is their industrial design driven culture. Most athletic footwear companies apparel offerings aren’t consistent with their shoe brands. They tend to be less hip and very sports marketing driven. Women don’t care about athlete endorsements and they buy a lot more clothes than men. The market is wide open for another sports apparel brand with original ideas to grab market share.

Dix&Pond is the blog of Dix & Pond Consulting Creative and strategic consulting for retail, wholesale apparel,  footwear, consumer products and branding agencies. Follow me to get the latest posts

Fashion Faux Pas-Stereotyping Older Consumers

For decades fashion retailers rode the Baby Boomer purchasing wave as they started, advanced and continue their careers. They were the first generation of educated women who fully intended to join the professional ranks, often putting off child-rearing to later in life or never at all. Consequently, they are the most-travelled, wealthiest and most independent women ever in the westernized world.  Retailers are always looking for unmet consumer demand and opportunities.  This large demographic still offers opportunity for companies that don’t fall in the trap of underestimating her, by addressing her with one broad brush.

There is unmet demand for age-appropriate, forward fashion for a 45+ contemporary customer.

There is unmet demand for age-appropriate, forward fashion for a 45+ contemporary customer.

This is the misconception. As all women age, they no longer want to show their figure and take fashion risks. They want cheaper quality and want to disappear into a decorative tunic. I won’t name names, but you all know the colorful, “soft” retailers that subscribe to a stereotypical formula and have hit a ceiling in an aging market. The customer for this type of merchandise is already well-served.

How could brands that target an older customer fail with a burgeoning aging female population? There are many lifestyle and niche markets in men and women of all ages from extremely conservative to fashion-obsessives. It is critical to understand the lifestyle and persona of the target audience and have realistic expectations of the demand.

Many 45+women still have great bodies, a sophisticated fashion sense and plenty of disposable income. They care about their appearance. Many customers don’t want to identify as old and reject the brands that imply it. The designers and retailers who subscribe to a one-size fits all image of this age group are having their matronly hat handed to them.

I know many stylish women in their 40-80’s, that won’t set foot in the well-known specialty stores and sites that target a “so-called” aging consumer with their floaty tops and frumpy pants. In fact, the softer the body, the more flattering structure becomes in a garment. Companies need to consider their specific target woman, values, taste, income and needs.

Of course, people’s bodies change as they age. All apparel companies in any category, have to target an age/body type for their consumer. They have to develop a standard fit, but not necessarily safe product to go with it. In some sense, the notion of a larger fit only for an aging population is becoming debatable, because of rising obesity rates in younger people raised on whipped caramel lattes.

There are fashion-forward contemporary brands such as Theory, Vince, Lululemon, Diane Von Furstenburg, AG, Joie to name a few, who are enjoying great success because they work for a wide range of body types that relate to their brand. Unfortunately the list is short. There is also a male boomer who wants stylish age appropriate contemporary merchandise. Brands like Hugo Boss, Theory, John Varvatos, Robert Graham, AG and Michael Kors are appealing to this ageless male contemporary customer. I believe the men’s business is experiencing robust sales because young men are adopting more dressed up looks for an edge in the job market, the major trend toward slimmer silhouettes and the 45+ customer who is fit, has money and doesn’t want to look old.

Fashion foward shoes & bags have been stand out sellers for all ages. (Valentino Rockstud Ballet Flat)

Fashion foward shoes & bags have been stand out sellers for all ages. (Valentino Rockstud Ballet Flat)

Why have shoes, bags, accessory and beauty products been the standouts categories for years? Partly because these are the democratic categories, in which all women can participate. There is a redundant oversupply of apparel in the market. Opportunity lies in forward, casual, flattering merchandise that accommodates an aging body. It may be a tad longer, less clingy and revealing, but maintain a serious sense of style, quality and sophistication. Simplicity is always in good taste. What is age-appropriate? Appropriateness, more than anything, is a flattering fit.

Some other posts you might enjoy:

Tough Retail: 7 Ways to Grow Your Consumer Brand

Why Fashion Brands Fail to Thrive

 

The Dix & Pond Blog, by Stephanie Bernier is the blog of  Dix & Pond Consulting, a Boston-based, company that consults on business strategy, trends, creative direction, brand experience, product development and merchandising. Clients include retailers, apparel, footwear & consumer companies.  CONTACT US TODAY! 

Thank you for liking and sharing this, if you enjoyed the post! 

Lululemon Pant Recall – Sheer Madness

Last week Lululemon’s stock took a hit on news of a recall of a batch of their “Wunder Under” black yoga pants. When worn by a consumer the pants appeared too sheer. This represented about 17% of their first quarter bottoms assortment and will have an impact on first quarter sales. Lululemon reacted quickly to recall the pants and in the spirit of “transparency”, notified Wall Street of the flap.

Lululemon spring gym bags.

Lululemon spring gym bags.

This sort of thing happens to all manufacturers and brought to mind an incident in my career when the company I worked for, shipped black pants weakened by overdyeing. The pants were splitting in the field and the unassuming customers were showing a lot more than a shadow of their undies! We survived and thrived. This is a case of sheer madness.

Jealous competitors will be disappointed, this incident will not put a dent in the Lululemon lovefest. The beloved Canadian active maker acted the hero, the protector of quality and the decency of their customer.  The missing inventory only represents a piece of their bottoms assortment.

Lululemon continues to innovate and delight their customers.

Lululemon continues to innovate and delight their customers.

The big winners will be those who buy the stock on the dip!

Dix&Pond is the blog of www.dixandpond.com Creative and strategic consulting for retail and wholesale apparel, shoe and consumer product companies. Follow me to get the latest posts

Feeding Frenzy – Lululemon

I admit it, I’m a dyed-in-the-Lycra, full-blown fan of Lululemon Athletica. I was one of the sharks in the holiday feeding frenzy for all things Lulu. On a visit last week after Christmas, I could hardly move around the 60 or so people I counted in the little store lusting after Lulu. They were spending gift cards, making exchanges and if they expected markdowns, they were sorely disappointed. This fashionable Canadian purveyor of athletic clothing has risen to cult status at full-price. This is a true fairy-tale ending to a lackluster holiday season for most retailers.

There are always sexy and functional sports bras and tops.

There are always sexy and functional sports bras and tops.

In a highly competitive apparel market Lululemon has proven that there is always still room for fresh design and a compelling brand experience. (I think the stores are bit dark, though). They churn out unique and creative silhouettes that flatter the athletic and not-so-athletic bodies of their adoring masses. They create demand for their feminine and tastefully sexy styles. They tout performance fabrications for real yoga and running aficionados, but the rest of us just love the great quality and are willing to pay for it. They have broken every rule of the old footwear apparel players. They make expensive, feminine, comfortable, durable and sometimes radical styles for women and men. They almost singlehandedly started the trend for yoga wear as everyday wear in and out of the gym.

Certainly upper management from the major athletic companies are sending spy drones in the stores to figure out their secret sauce. They are buying and dissecting garments and creating their own vanilla versions. This is a recipe without all the ingredients. They are missing the point; it is Lululemon’s originality that makes it special. It is getting to the finish line first. Who cares about second place?

The opportunity for growth for Lululemon is still very great, as they are still far from a household name. They could benefit from larger stores and certainly more men’s product. Girls would be a smash hit, too. If I was a Nordstrom or Bloomingdales’s buyer, I would be begging for a wholesale line.

December Lululemon deliveries included signature pink and black jackets and a unique lace print used on tops and bottoms.

December Lululemon deliveries included signature pink and black jackets and a unique lace print used on tops and bottoms.

Dix&Pond is the blog of www.dixandpond.com Creative and strategic consulting for retail and wholesale apparel, shoe and consumer product companies. Follow me to get the latest posts

6 Reasons Fashion Brands Fail to Thrive

Many apparel, shoe or accessory brands fail to grow, thrive or evolve over time. Fashion is discretionary. Clothing, footwear,  jewelry, handbags and accessories are emotionally driven purchases. Brands are much more than products, they are a total experience.

Consumers must identify with the implied promise of the brand to become loyal customers. Here is a slide show of the 6 main reasons that fashion brands fail to thrive and some of the stellar brands that are knocking it out of the park:

What holds footwear companies back in apparel?

The active apparel category is more than twice the size of the athletic footwear market, but when it comes to brand extensions into apparel most footwear companies don’t reach their potential. This phenomenon is well documented. Public shoe companies continuously proclaim it a growth opportunity, but somehow continue to come up short. Here are 6 reasons to explain it:

Cultural Mindset  Footwear companies tend to be industrial design driven. Industrial designers focus on design, but place a higher value on engineering and performance. Footwear companies tend to hire like-minded individuals.

Fashion designers come from a fine arts point of view and see the world differently. Apparel firms focus on fashion drivers like trends, color, styling, brand promise and the emotional connection it involves. Performance and construction are secondary. Diversity of thought makes a creative organization stronger.

Lack of Creative Risk Taking  In the past many active footwear companies believed that they could simply print their logo on a basic tee, and it would sell itself. Active apparel, for the most part, was poor quality commodities. The active apparel category was lackluster and the assumption was that this was a budget priced segment. Then fashion risk takers like Under Armour and Lululemon, came along with emotionally charged products and branding and turned the theory on its head. These two companies were born from apparel roots and became the de facto leaders in active apparel. You get paid for great work.

Lululemon has succeeded to make expensive yoga wear into everyday casual wear, way beyond yoga. They take real fashion risks and lead the market, through styling innovation. Their styles are unique, figure flattering, with an eye for thoughtful tiny details. They release fresh, funky items, in short supply and have trained the customer to buy at full-price or miss the fun. Last year they released a sell-out tutu for barre exercise. A woman could live out her inner ballerina fantasy!

Lululemon's barre tutu

Lululemon’s sell-out tutu!

Market Assumptions  Most athletic footwear companies assume the world revolves around sports and the celebrity endorsement. This may be true for men, but not so for women. Men may connect emotionally with their favorite football player. Women buy shoes and apparel based on how the brands fill their emotional needs and they are different.

Women’s apparel is a bigger opportunity, as they buy significantly more apparel than men. Companies often assume performance has greater value over style. The truth is most people who wear athletic shoes aren’t athletes.

Brand Clarity  Every consumer product company needs to understand who they want to sell and deliver compelling product that fills their audience’s wants and needs. Consistency is paramount, the message can’t be muddled. If your brand is “cool” all your products must be equally “cool”. To lead a market, you have to get ahead of it and take some calculated fashion risks. This is more critical than ever in the highly competitive fashion industry.

Analysis Paralysis  Fashion’s greatest leaders have an intuitive sense of what is right for their brands. Do you think Michael Kors, J Crew, Anthropologie and other fashion leaders look to focus groups to decide what to offer? The common denominator is a visionary leader with their head in the details. Lululemon says they don’t use focus groups; they just observe their customer and keep her top-of-mind. It is easy to get too analytical and bureaucratic with the creative process. Large committees water down the soup. Footwear companies like engineers, like can get too hung up in process.

Lead Times  Footwear companies have longer lead times due to the complexities of shoe production. Apparel companies try to develop as close to the season to be as on-trend as possible. This makes it difficult for footwear manufacturers to react to current fashion.

The barrier to entry is much higher to develop new shoes. Mold costs can be prohibitive to experimentation. It can be far less costly to experiment in apparel so it allows for more creativity.

The Dix & Pond Blog is the blog of  Dix & Pond Consulting,  a Boston-based, company that consults on trend and creative direction, brand experience and business strategy, product development, merchandising and provides executive coaching for retail, apparel, footwear & consumer products companies.  CONTACT US TODAY!  or call 617.733.7411

Thank you for liking and sharing this, if you enjoyed the post!  Follow me to get the latest posts!

 

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