Is Bankruptcy Looming for J.Crew?

J. Crew’s Financials Aren’t Good

A Reuters article, dated 11/16/16 is speculating that J.Crew is considering a spin-off of their successful Madewell division, in a likely attempt to raise cash. According to the 3rd quarter 2016 results, J.Crew stores had a 7% sales decline and including Madewell, had roughly $1.5 billion in debt and just $38 million in cash. This is not a healthy place to be.

What happened to one of the best specialty retailers in America? It’s easy to blame mall traffic, but those shoppers are shopping elsewhere and online. By the way, J.Crew has had an exceptional e-commerce site for many years.

They got caught in a maelstrom of changing trends and self-inflicted wounds.

The 4 Biggest Reasons J.Crew is Struggling

Millennial shoppers are the most strapped generation in decades. This largest demographic in the history of the US, is now 16-33. They are the most diverse American generation ever, with a wide range of tastes. Their shallow pockets have given rise to fast-fashion, consignment, rental and vintage apparel sales. I don’t think they aren’t interested in fashion, but clothing is discretionary after rent, school debt, healthcare, transportation and food costs. 

J. Crew had been dogged by inconsistent quality and styling.

J. Crew had been dogged by inconsistent quality and styling.

J.Crew seemed to target this growing base with lower quality materials in an attempt to decrease or hold prices. They also dabbled in trendier silhouettes, adding to the brand confusion. In the classic business you walk a fine line, to offer the expected, with a touch of newness to excite the customer.

Seemingly, in an attempt to be all things to all customers, they alienated fans that saw them as the quality, hip “American” lifestyle brand in the mall. They should have embraced their monopoly as a reliable, premium brand and let the rest of the generic tenants duke it out.

J.Crew had what they thought was a winning formula, cotton/spandex Capri pants, cashmere sweaters and cotton tees. They rested on formulaic laurels while customers were discovering more comfortable, durable and flattering fabrics in athletic apparel from the likes of Lululemon and many others. The rapid adoption of athleisure was lost on J.Crew. They didn’t see that customers were embracing a new casual. They should have evolved some of their assortment to address the exodus, in new fabrications or styling with a J.Crew spin. They just launched, in fall 2016, a “brand-right” athletic apparel collaboration with New Balance, maybe too little, too late. The athletic apparel market has much less elbow room at this point.

There are new kids on the block. At one time, J.Crew was the epitome of the modern prepster. They blended an urbane twist with classic American looks, to define an eclectic, cool state of prep. This wearable market position had a wide audience with fashion and traditional customers.

This late summer 2016 product is what they are know for, classic with a twist.

This late summer 2016 product is what they are known for, classic with a twist.

In recent years, they veered off course with poor quality or trendy items, overly eclectic pairings and strange colors, a road too far for their loyal customer.

As J.Crew confused its customer, they created a vacuum for other rapidly growing, consistent brands to fill. Kate Spade has taken away legions of suburban and urban women of all ages with their whimsical, colorful vibe. Vineyard Vines offers the traditional country club and aspiring wanna-bees,  preppy classics, that really resonate with Millennials. J. McLaughlin attracts the hard-core suburban prepster with uber-traditional, quality clothes. Tory Burch skims off the East Side, preppy customer. Club Monaco speaks to the contemporary, classic customer. These five brands are growing and nibbling at J.Crew’s forgotten following. The pie is only so big and their slice is getting smaller.

There continues to be significant markdowns across categories.

There continues to be significant markdowns across categories.

The stores need a facelift. The above brands have bright, organized new store formats. J.Crew’s shops are cluttered, chaotic and dark and the wood paneling feels very Brooks Brother’s 1992. They don’t highlight their best categories in a focused, shoppable layout. The brand experience needs a serious intervention, a difficult task, with mountains of debt.

None of these opinions are probably news to J.Crew. This is a formidable company with tremendous talent. Maybe they became too insular or content?

This product is a bright spot in the Fall 2016 assortment.

This product is a bright spot in the Fall 2016 assortment.

Amidst the clutter this fall, I’ve seen glimpses of the best of J.Crew. Time will tell, if it’s enough to save them from a painful bankruptcy. It’s not looking good based on 3rd quarter results.

Most retailers never achieve the iconic consumer and fashion industry respect of J.Crew. I’m rooting for them to turn this ship around.

 

Some other posts you might enjoy:

Decoding Millennial Shopping Traits & Habits

Are Sporting Goods & Outdoor in a Death Spiral?

7 Common Fashion Brand Management Mistakes

 

The Dix & Pond Blog, by Stephanie Bernier is the blog of  Dix & Pond Consulting, a Boston-based, company that consults on business strategy, creative direction, brand experience, trends, product development and merchandising. Clients include retailers, apparel, footwear & consumer companies.  CONTACT US TODAY! 

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A “Dear John” Letter to J. Crew

To Mickey Drexler

Dear Mickey,

I write you with a heavy heart. You promised me that things were going to get better between us, but you still seem to be lost. The news around town is your sales are down and your debt rating isn’t great.

For years, I have been faithful to you, buying into your ideas, filling my closet and heart with tees, shirts, pants, dresses and even suits. You were my reliable love, a high-quality guy consistently offering the expected, with enough fashion surprises, that I kept coming back for more. I could always count on you. You made my life easy.

Mark down tee shirts at J Crew.

Markdown tee shirts at J. Crew.

No one could do it better. I never missed a chance to stop by in the mall. I toss most catalogs, but always save J. Crew for my next cup of coffee. Inevitably, I would grab my cell and buy into your fantastic stories once again. You were my Svengali.

When I wrote you months ago, you promised to change, go back to the old Mickey. I think you forgot who you are, the quality, pedigreed guy with colorful new ideas. You were the diamond-in-the-rough, in a sea of mall stores with similarly dismal apparel offerings. You don’t understand the unique place you had in my mind or the mall.

Did you hang with the wrong crowd? Do you think you should play with the fast-fashion girls to be cool? You played their cheap tricks and confused me with your reckless behavior.

As casual apparel got more athletic, you missed putting a J. Crew spin on it. This revolution was about sportiness, comfort and new materials, not the same old fits and fabrics.

Your career team is on a losing streak too, poor fabrics and skimpy fits. They clearly need a new coach.

J Crew career dress.

J. Crew career dress.

Sadly, you are addicted to cropped pants, cashmere cardis and slubby tees. You don’t recognize that even classic girls evolve. Your not thinking clearly. I know you have good genes. Your kid-sister Madewell, is on track to become a star. She has a clear brand direction and a bright future.

I’m sorry to say there is someone else, named Club Monaco. I get contemporary classic fashion-with-a-twist again. I’m willing to pay higher prices for quality in a hipper environment. I’m tired of the dark-paneled woodiness and your chaotic behavior. My current love is handsome, sexy and takes me to new places. He “gets” me.

Club Monaco spring trench.

Club Monaco spring trench.

Maybe someday we will be together again? Good brand management and design is about evolution and reinvention. You need an intervention and to hang with a better crowd. Your loving family hasn’t forgotten the good man you are.

 

You may enjoy these previous posts:

7 Common Fashion Brand Management Mistakes

Color Trends 2016/2017 Going Green

The Dix & Pond Blog, by Stephanie Bernier is the blog of  Dix & Pond Consulting, a Boston-based, company that consults on brand experience, business strategy, trends, creative direction, product development and merchandising. Clients include retailers, apparel, footwear & consumer companies.  CONTACT US TODAY! 

Thank you for liking and sharing this, if you enjoyed the post! 

 

 

 

 

6 Five-Star Specialty Retailers in a Lackluster Field

I was shopping in New York recently and feeling rather uninspired. I usually have an agenda, a new store or retailer, I am particularly excited about. Most large retailers make their own apparel and accessory products, so the watery soup is often spoiled by too many cooks, adding their managerial spice. It’s increasingly hard to find good retail theater, a strong brand identity and exciting, well-designed product, that hasn’t been tainted by levels of bureaucrats.

I challenged myself to come up with 6 “five-star” retailers that are doing an outstanding job, with a consistent brand experience and compelling fashion in a lackluster field:

1. Madewell, 2. Athleta, 3. Club Monaco, 4. Michael Kors, 5. Zara, 6. Lou & Grey

1. Madewell, 2. Athleta, 3. Club Monaco, 4. Michael Kors, 5. Zara, 6. Lou & Grey

Madewell – is the baby sister of J. Crew. I have been a long-time J. Crew proponent, even though the mothership has stumbled lately. Madewell is coming into its own with American casual classics, based around core denim pieces. You know to expect great jeans, chambray shirts, denim jackets, hip tees and knits, funky socks, rustic leather bags and shoes and slightly bohemian jewelry. The colors are simple and lean to the neutral side. The collection is totally wearable and much better-than-average quality for the price, a winning combination. This high-growth chain has little competition in the mall and will now be sold in Nordstrom as well.

Athleta – I was not a fan of fan of Athleta when Gap purchased it in 2008 for a mere $150 million. At the time their “zen-like” yoga prints and mass-market color sense paled against activewear, fashion pioneer Lululemon. Gap was betting on the powerful athleisure trend in apparel and has put their considerable product development muscle and resources behind the chain. They now have over 100 stores and have shed those expected “new-age” prints for a powerful collection of more urbane, sexy, forward clothing. They get that the athletic trend is worn as much out of the gym, as in, with their deep collection of cosmopolitan casual dresses, knit tops, bottoms and huge assortment of mix and match swimwear. I actually bought a $500 leather jacket at this formerly “perky” yoga chain and have never even done a downward dog.

Club Monaco – is a Canadian-based acquisition, part of the Ralph Lauren Corporation. Certainly not a household word, they only have approximately 140 stores worldwide. Club Monaco offers women’s and men’s collections of modern, urbane classics at affordable luxury prices points. Tasteful, upscale and contemporary, they are especially strong in knit tops, dresses, jackets, skirts and accessories for work and play. The quality of design and materials, far exceeds the price points to make Club Monaco a fairly hidden gem.

Michael Kors – Wandering through Macy’s first floor flagship the other day, I was blown away by the crowd of at least 40 people in the Michael Kors shop. The Coach concession across the hall had 2 visitors. it wasn’t a special event, it was business as usual for this hot-shot, brand-of-the-moment.

Michael Kors is a text-book example of consistent branding. The uber-glam handbags, watches, shoes and “bit of an after note”, clothing are precisely on the same urbane plane. Their stores, website, marketing collateral and product are as in sync as an Argentine tango. Chock it up as a real designer with one eye for everything. Even if you are getting tired of his ubiquitous bags, this brand is fashion branding royalty.

Zara – is fast-fashion at it’s finest. Owned by Spanish parent Inditex, in my book it blows away competitors H&M and Forever 21. They consistently put out easy-to-shop collections of fashion forward apparel and accessories, that defy their puny price points. Taken out of context the styling and quality could be mistaken for some of the best. There is no doubt what to expect at Zara, the best fashion trends in real-time, at really low prices. Zara brand profile as fashion leader, is crystal clear.

Lou & Grey – is a new free-standing store concept brand from parent Ann, Inc. It was born from the success of loungy apparel in their Loft chain. When I stumbled upon the Natick, Ma concept store, I was pleasantly surprised by the small sophisticated, upscale environment and compelling collection of lifestyle casual apparel and earthy accessories. This is the best thing Ann Inc. has done in a while. It is easier to do something new than reinvent history. Ann Taylor and Loft have become sterilized versions of their glory days with poor quality, dull offerings and banal stores. Currently only 7 stores,  Lou & Grey is one to watch.

Dix&Pond is the blog of Dix & Pond Consulting Creative and strategic consulting for retail, wholesale apparel, footwear, consumer products and branding agencies. Follow me to get the latest posts

A Letter To Mickey Drexler – What Happened To J.Crew?

Dear Mickey,

We need to talk. I thought you were “the one”. I consider myself a classic girl, the type you can bring home to mother, with an individualist fashion sensibility. After a very long loving relationship with J. Crew, I feel we’re drifting apart. You showed me the love, always wanted to please and surprise me. I gave you loads of attention and spent a lot of money on you. Lately our relationship has gotten repetitive, lost its color and doesn’t fulfill my needs. I’m not faithful to you anymore. Let me be specific on where our relationship lost its way:

1. You missed the athleisure trend. No, I don’t do downward dogs, but am very active at 2 gyms. I have blurred the lines between gym clothes and ones “formerly known as casual” in my wardrobe. Lately, I’m tired of shapeless cotton tees, that get little holes at the waist. I’m buying more substantial, expensive, inventive and sexy athletic tops for everyday use. You continue pushing twill cropped pants, when I am buying knit pants that look like jeans and sweats. I’ve never seen a comfortable knit dress in J.Crew.

I had a big crush on Lululemon, but find myself stalking a new love named Athleta. I’m loving athletic inspired outerwear, too. Who would have thought 2 years ago, I would buy a $500 leather/French terry moto jacket from my new crush?

Great outerwear is dominating athleisure apparel.

Great outerwear is dominating athleisure apparel.

You are the master of the casual playlist, taking classic pieces and pairing them in a hipper way. Somehow you missed the macro trend of mixing quality sport-inspired items into one’s everyday wardrobe.

2. You used take me on quality dates. Lately, you seem to be cheaping out, taking me to “fast-fashion ” places. I would rather pay more for a good meal. Why did the fabric qualities go down hill? I’d rather pay $98 at Lululemon for a relationship that will last, than $58 for a quick hook-up.

J. Crew stores lost the sharp focus of Madewell and became cluttered with junk food. Are you distracted by the Zara and Forever 21 effect? They aren’t your competition.

3. I thought you loved tall girls? Many of your clothes don’t fit me. I’m on the tall side (5’9″) and physically fit. Many of your specs are either too short or cut really small. Your customers aren’t all 24, 5′ 4″ and a size 0.

4. You don’t give me the attention you used to. I would never “trash” your catalogs, and always took your calls. The catalogs arouse me, causing emotionally driven online behavior. I would always buy more than needed. I get fewer catalogs now, so you  stopped “playing me” with your enticing images.

A look from J Crew for Spring 2015.

A look from J Crew for Spring 2015.

5.  Something changed. I trusted you to color my world. Some of the colors got very repetitive and harshly un-wearable. Dirty ochre anyone?

Mickey, I will never forget the good times. I’m definitely willing to give us another chance. I think about you often and still drive by your house. I need you to be the reliable source for key items like tees, shirts and sweaters, but mixed with more exciting quality pieces. You have a special place in the mall. You just got in with the wrong crowd.

Dix&Pond is the blog of Dix & Pond Consulting Creative and strategic consulting for retail, wholesale apparel, footwear, consumer products and branding agencies. Follow me to get the latest posts

6 Reasons Fashion Brands Fail to Thrive

Many apparel, shoe or accessory brands fail to grow, thrive or evolve over time. Fashion is discretionary. Clothing, footwear,  jewelry, handbags and accessories are emotionally driven purchases. Brands are much more than products, they are a total experience.

Consumers must identify with the implied promise of the brand to become loyal customers. Here is a slide show of the 6 main reasons that fashion brands fail to thrive and some of the stellar brands that are knocking it out of the park:

I started my career as a knitwear designer, so I will always have a passionate love affair with sweaters. The stores are filled with some of the most irresistibly cozy, sporty and whimsical knits seen in many seasons. Knits have their fashion ups and downs, but we are currently spinning in one of the biggest sweater cycles in years.

Sweaters are the dominant apparel category for holiday 2012. Fresh shapes, colorblocks, fairisles, metallics, embellished and quirky intarsias are everywhere. When intarsias come back in style, you know you are in full-blown knitwear revival.  I suspect sweaters will be standout sellers for 4th quarter 2012 and will be back with a vengeance for 2013.

Shape is the biggest story with a flair for the dramatic. These scene-stealers are easy and oversized.  There are voluminous cardigans, off-the shoulder scoop necks, batwings, kimonos, crops and capes. Details include uneven hems, ties, wraps, outside seaming, sporty details and back interest. The silhouettes are full- fashioned or sewn into radically new shapes. Outside seaming is used to tailor and create interest.  Oversized shapes tend to have some close to the body element, like tight sleeves on a boxy wide crop. Dramatic necklines include oversized cowls, deep v’s, shawls, wide scoops and mega ruffles.

Color is either wearable sumptuous neutrals, especially greys and navy or mouth-watering bright and bold.

Gauges are either very chunky or drapey, soft fine gauge.

Fibers are soft and inviting, not itchy or harsh. Cashmere and merino wool dominate in fine gauge. For chunky machine knits there are complex blends of soft, lightweight wools, acrylics and slub yarns.

Techniques include machine and hefty hand knit Jacquards, fine gauge intarsias, pieced and patched materials and stitches, color blocking, cables, sporty details, embellished  jeweled collars and  bibs and ribs of all weights.

Here is a roundup of the looks:

Dix&Pond is the blog of www.dixandpond.com Creative and strategic consulting for retail and wholesale apparel, shoe and consumer product companies. Contact us for custom trend analysis, creative direction, strategic marketing, brand profiles, merchandising, etc.

5 Reasons Why Fashion Brands Fail to Thrive

Creating a successful new apparel, shoe or accessory brand is difficult. Keeping it consistent and evolving with the audience over the long haul is challenging. Repairing a flagging brand is nearly impossible.

Fashion brands are not just individual products. The products, marketing, multi-channel experience, customer service and corporate identity are all an expression of a greater deliverable to the consumer. A successful brand is a total experience that the consumer can identify with. Consumers express who they are or want to be, by the brands they choose.

Too Narrow a Niche – Every brand concept has an audience of a least one. The success of a brand will depend on the size of the audience for whom it resonates and can’t grow beyond owning 100% of it. Understanding the size of the niche is critical to setting growth expectations. The most successful fashion brands are a lifestyle and tend to reach a wide spectrum of ages. Classic American brands like Ralph Lauren, Coach or J. Crew have the potential to reach a wider audience, than smaller niche brands like Betsy Johnson, BCBG or Coldwater Creek.

Lack of Identity – All great brands need to have a distinct personality. What they are and what they imply is essential to defining the brand identity. Half- baked concepts and inconsistent messages are dead on arrival. Brands have to have a soul and authenticity.

Too Many Cooks in the Soup – Great brands are focused and have consistent storytelling. Compelling stories are not crafted by committees, but generally woven by creative and opinionated visionaries. Mickey Drexler at J. Crew and Mike Jefferies at Abercrombie are perfect examples of this. They both have a reputation for razor-sharp clarity of vision and have their heads in the details for their entire brand experience. They offer consistent products and take fashion risks within the context of their brand story.  Behind every great brand you will find a strong brand champion.

On the other hand, many wholesale or retail private brands are lackluster, because silos of management are allowed to tinker with the offer, and the brand becomes a spiceless soup.

Clinging to History – Fashion brands with the longest history often find it difficult to find a current relevance. Customers evolve. Staff can get hamstrung by the past and they rest their laurels on old successes. They keep regurgitating them. They often don’t understand what the brand promised to the consumer. They only see the brand in terms of the individual products that were successful in their best times. They don’t have the vision to tell the brand story through relevant products in a current context.

Talbots is perfect example of this. In their heyday, Talbots was synonymous with a monied, New England coastal, lifestyle. Their customers played exclusive sports and volunteered at non-profits. They had the luxury of choosing not to work. If they worked, they were professionals or women rapidly climbing the corporate ladder. If it wasn’t your lifestyle, shopping at Talbot’s was entre to the exclusive club. There was a definitive social status for shopping at the red-doored, suburban stores. They sold a lifestyle, embodied in their total experience.

Talbot’s today is sailing in a dead calm. It lost its personality and cache of the New England good life a long time ago. The series of CEOs since Mrs. Talbot, didn’t understand what they were trading away. They didn’t understand how the customer evolved and weren’t protective of the exclusivity, the implied status of the brand. They opened cookie cutter stores in bland locations with a gyrating assortment. The theater grew bigger than the audience for the brand. It wasn’t special to shop at Talbot’s anymore. It became synonymous with an aging customer and their boomer customers don’t want to identify themselves as old.

Coach and Burberry are great examples of classic brands that have evolved a long history, into even bigger success.

Traditional Marketing vs. Engagement – We live in a diverse, fast-paced culture with the added complexity of a splintered media. Traditional marketing on TV or print media don’t have the reach they once did. Creating brand awareness has become increasingly complex because consumers have so many shopping and entertainment options. Marketing has become interactive, no longer a one way street. They are bombarded with messaging and will filter to the most interesting and engaging experiences with limited personal time.

Brands have to be keenly aware as to who the audience is and engage customers on their terms. Social media gives the customer a big platform to create or destroy brands.

Dix&Pond is the blog of www.dixandpond.com                                                                                                                                                                    Creative and strategic consulting for retail and wholesale apparel, shoe and consumer product companies.

Take the brand quiz… Can you identify these successful brands?

Can you identify all of these distinct brands? See answers below.

Answers: A= Coach, B=Tom’s, C=Lululemon, D=Michael Kors, E=J. Crew, F=Vera Bradley

Timelessly Chic – Newport News

2012 is undoubtedly one of the most colorful years in women’s fashion. Neon color and uber brights will stop you in your “espadrille trodden” tracks. These enchanting hues can transport a working girl from cubicle to samba, in a flash of Tangerine Tango!

Amongst the colorful chaos stands a timeless, American, nautical inspired trend. I call it Newport News, elegant, simple, a tad preppy and screaming good taste. It perennially rears its lovely head in transitional seasons, like early spring and summer. Think dry cottons…canvas and twill, breezy voiles, openwork sweaters, rope soles and handles and leather luggage details. Simple two-toned stripes and nautical motifs are the primary graphics.

Newport News - American Nautical Trend for 2012

This is more of an important accessory story, than full-blown “down-on-the-docks” dressing. It can just be one refined item like J Crew’s sequined anchor top or as simple as a striped boat neck from Rugby. Make it modern by pairing refined pieces with more casual ones. Like sequins with denim or a sateen striped clutch with a rustic knit sweater. Bottoms include denim shorts, slim and flared jeans, as well as pleated long or short skirts.

In shoes, think fabric…espadrilles, ropey wedges, ballet flats, as well as boat shoes. For bags there are roomy fabric totes, wicker clutches, back packs and sturdy leather bags. Longchamp’s white Le Pliage totes are also perfect “nautical chic”.

Officer’s navy and sail white are the primary tones, but can be accessorized with brazen accents of banana, poppy, emerald or orange.

The best “Newport News “accessories and clothing can be found from the beloved, usual prepster suspects…Rugby, J Crew, Madewell, Kate Spade, Milly, Tory Burch, Sperry, Coach, Longchamp, and Ralph Lauren.

Newport News is a natural trend for home decor. The contrast of polished with casual textures, is perfect for an urban loft or coastal cottage.

Dix&pond is the blog of Dix& Pond Consulting.

 

In Step – Colorful Shoes

For several years, shoe and handbag sales have been far more robust than women’s apparel. In an economic downturn, women turn to accessories for a wardrobe update. A strong new silhouette, pattern, status brand or colorful accessory can refresh existing apparel basics. It is not surprising that women have also turned to exciting and unusual colors and finishes in nail polish recently. Nail color is one of the fastest growing areas in beauty, as it gives a woman an inexpensive way to make a daring fashion statement. Beauty companies like the shoe and accessory manufacturers have continued to “up-the-ante” and offer color where no woman (or many manufacturers) dared to go in the past. They have created some of the most showstopping footwear lately and are getting paid for their risk taking. I expect this emotionally driven shoe trend to continue in seasons to come.

Colorful shoes are a huge footwear trend for 2012.

Shoes and bags have taken center stage over apparel sales in the past few years. Very colorful statement shoes and bags are a dominant accessory trend for 2012.

Who needs another basic black pant; but who can resist a pair of hot pink “life changing” sandals?

The hottest trend in shoes (and handbags) this year is strong, unabashed color and pattern. Bright, neon, pastel colors and prints are on sandals, wedges, espadrilles, pumps, platforms, two-tone oxfords, flats and athletic shoes. Personally, I couldn’t pass up orange patent wedges from J. Crew and was mesmerized by a yellow patent Ted Baker bag. Banana yellow? I have never owned a yellow accessory in my life.

Some of the best colorful shoes this season are from unexpected sources…Stuart Weitzman, Cole Haan and Nike. Great color and patterns can be found from J Crew, Tom’s, Sperry Topsider, Kate Spade, Fendi, Giuseppe Zanotti, Brian Atwood, Prada and many more.

Did you buy a colorful shoe this season?

Dix&pond is the blog of Dix& Pond Consulting.

The New Neutral for 2012

Color trends evolve slowly and steadily. They rarely appear unexpectedly. This year we are caught without much warning in a tidal wave of cheerful yellow apparel, accessories, home products and decor. From tender sorbet to banana to sunflower, this optimistic, south-facing color family, is the new neutral for spring 2012!

For the past year or so something strange has come over me. Colors that never excited me have become my new favorites. Whipped butter, baby chick and day lily have infiltrated my brain. Yellow, a non-existent color in my closet, is going to play a starring role in my black and white wardrobe this spring. I was tasered by a buttercup, patent leather Ted Baker tote. Until I got home, I didn’t I realize what I had done.

Yellow is the new neutral for 2012!

Yellow is the new neutral for 2012!

Perhaps yellow is the antidote to years of recessionary malaise? This burst of sunshine is most modern when worn with other bold brights, or historically unusual parings like bright yellow with grey or beige. It pops in prints played off of grey and white. Yellow can make a vibrant or delicate statement in active wear, shoes, jeans, handbags, lingerie, dresses, accessories and home decor. I expect it to gain steam and be with us for a while. Even if it isn’t your most flattering color, you can get your yellow fix away from the face in a jean or boot.

I especially like the use of yellow this season by BCBG, J Crew, Crate and Barrel, Rag and Bone, 7 for All Mankind, Robert Rodriquez, Sam Edelman, Sperry, Rebecca Minkoff, Tory Burch and Ted Baker.

Dix&Pond is the blog of dix & pond consulting

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