5 Reasons Why Fashion Brands Fail to Thrive

Creating a successful new apparel, shoe or accessory brand is difficult. Keeping it consistent and evolving with the audience over the long haul is challenging. Repairing a flagging brand is nearly impossible.

Fashion brands are not just individual products. The products, marketing, multi-channel experience, customer service and corporate identity are all an expression of a greater deliverable to the consumer. A successful brand is a total experience that the consumer can identify with. Consumers express who they are or want to be, by the brands they choose.

Too Narrow a Niche – Every brand concept has an audience of a least one. The success of a brand will depend on the size of the audience for whom it resonates and can’t grow beyond owning 100% of it. Understanding the size of the niche is critical to setting growth expectations. The most successful fashion brands are a lifestyle and tend to reach a wide spectrum of ages. Classic American brands like Ralph Lauren, Coach or J. Crew have the potential to reach a wider audience, than smaller niche brands like Betsy Johnson, BCBG or Coldwater Creek.

Lack of Identity – All great brands need to have a distinct personality. What they are and what they imply is essential to defining the brand identity. Half- baked concepts and inconsistent messages are dead on arrival. Brands have to have a soul and authenticity.

Too Many Cooks in the Soup – Great brands are focused and have consistent storytelling. Compelling stories are not crafted by committees, but generally woven by creative and opinionated visionaries. Mickey Drexler at J. Crew and Mike Jefferies at Abercrombie are perfect examples of this. They both have a reputation for razor-sharp clarity of vision and have their heads in the details for their entire brand experience. They offer consistent products and take fashion risks within the context of their brand story.  Behind every great brand you will find a strong brand champion.

On the other hand, many wholesale or retail private brands are lackluster, because silos of management are allowed to tinker with the offer, and the brand becomes a spiceless soup.

Clinging to History – Fashion brands with the longest history often find it difficult to find a current relevance. Customers evolve. Staff can get hamstrung by the past and they rest their laurels on old successes. They keep regurgitating them. They often don’t understand what the brand promised to the consumer. They only see the brand in terms of the individual products that were successful in their best times. They don’t have the vision to tell the brand story through relevant products in a current context.

Talbots is perfect example of this. In their heyday, Talbots was synonymous with a monied, New England coastal, lifestyle. Their customers played exclusive sports and volunteered at non-profits. They had the luxury of choosing not to work. If they worked, they were professionals or women rapidly climbing the corporate ladder. If it wasn’t your lifestyle, shopping at Talbot’s was entre to the exclusive club. There was a definitive social status for shopping at the red-doored, suburban stores. They sold a lifestyle, embodied in their total experience.

Talbot’s today is sailing in a dead calm. It lost its personality and cache of the New England good life a long time ago. The series of CEOs since Mrs. Talbot, didn’t understand what they were trading away. They didn’t understand how the customer evolved and weren’t protective of the exclusivity, the implied status of the brand. They opened cookie cutter stores in bland locations with a gyrating assortment. The theater grew bigger than the audience for the brand. It wasn’t special to shop at Talbot’s anymore. It became synonymous with an aging customer and their boomer customers don’t want to identify themselves as old.

Coach and Burberry are great examples of classic brands that have evolved a long history, into even bigger success.

Traditional Marketing vs. Engagement – We live in a diverse, fast-paced culture with the added complexity of a splintered media. Traditional marketing on TV or print media don’t have the reach they once did. Creating brand awareness has become increasingly complex because consumers have so many shopping and entertainment options. Marketing has become interactive, no longer a one way street. They are bombarded with messaging and will filter to the most interesting and engaging experiences with limited personal time.

Brands have to be keenly aware as to who the audience is and engage customers on their terms. Social media gives the customer a big platform to create or destroy brands.

Dix&Pond is the blog of www.dixandpond.com                                                                                                                                                                    Creative and strategic consulting for retail and wholesale apparel, shoe and consumer product companies.

Take the brand quiz… Can you identify these successful brands?

Can you identify all of these distinct brands? See answers below.

Answers: A= Coach, B=Tom’s, C=Lululemon, D=Michael Kors, E=J. Crew, F=Vera Bradley

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: